Facebook Changes Cover Photo Guidelines

Apart from the major announcements about Facebook’s new newsfeed and timeline designs, the Facebook marketing team has quietly removed some of the restrictions on how marketers can use a page cover photo.
Up until the 21st of March, 2013, the 17th December version of the platform prevented any kind of marketing in the cover image, and also – as with any promoted image – text was not allowed to comprise more than 20% of the image area.
These were the restrictions up until March 20th:
  1. images with more than 20% text;
  2. price or purchase information, such as “40% off” or “Download it on socialmusic.com”;
  3. contact information such as a website address, email, mailing address, or information that should go in your Page’s “About” section;
  4. references to Facebook features or actions, such as “Like” or “Share” or an arrow pointing from the cover photo to any of these features; or
  5. calls to action, such as “Get it now” or “Tell your friends.”
Facebook Page Guidelines Change | The Social Clinic | thesocialclinic.comNow, although the 20% text rule is still in place and the date of the guidelines unchanged, it looks as though Page owners are free to invite visitors to click, buy, like, tell their friends, get money off or visit a brand website. (This guidelines page makes no mention of other restrictions either).
To make it easy and quick for all our ‘non-marketer’ readers, here are the old cover photo rules along with edits:
Covers may not include:
  1.  images with more than 20% text;
  2. REMOVED: price or purchase information, such as “40% off” or “Download it on socialmusic.com”;
  3. REMOVED: contact information such as a website address, email, mailing address, or information that should go in your Page’s “About” section;
  4. REMOVED: references to Facebook features or actions, such as “Like” or “Share” or an arrow pointing from the cover photo to any of these features; or
  5. REMOVED: calls to action, such as “Get it now” or “Tell your friends.”
As a result, there have been countless marketers proclaiming their excitement about how they are pumped about the easing of rules and the potential to move back to advertising promotions and featuring calls to actions on their cover photos (like in the days of Facebook landing pages, where big arrows with the word LIKE were very popular).
Happy 7th Birthday Twitter!Facebook Brings Threaded Comments & Replies To Pages